Nov 032013
 

I wanted to share a small victory. A relative had proclaimed herself an anti-GMO person to my consternation. She started sending me links, all of which I refuted. Then she told me she’d watched these 2 movies: Genetic Roulette and Genetic Chili, which, so help me, I watched on a Sunday afternoon.

After I watched Genetic Roulette, I sent her to this page which refutes point by point the assertions from the first film (actually from the self-published book that the film was based on).

Then, I watched the second one, Genetic Chili and saw it was directed by the same guy. So, I looked him up on Wikipedia. From his entry:

A variety of American organic food companies see Smith “as a champion for their interests”,[1] and Smith’s supporters describe him as “arguably the world’s foremost expert on the topic of genetically modified foods”.[20] In contrast, Michael Specter, writing in The New Yorker, reported that Smith was presented as a “scientist” on The Dr. Oz Show despite his lack of any scientific experience or relevant qualifications.[3] Bruce Chassy, a molecular biologist and food scientist, wrote to the show arguing that Smith’s “only professional experience prior to taking up his crusade against biotechnology is as a ballroom-dance teacher, yogic flying instructor, and political candidate for the Maharishi cult’s natural-law party.”[3].

I also noted that much of the assertions in the second movie were based on the findings of debunked studies by French microbiologist Gilles-Eric Séralini

After that, she wrote these magic words: “You are starting to persuade me. The de-bunking of Genetic Roulette is pretty thorough.”

Yes! OK, it’s not definitive. It’s just a start. But hey, any movement toward the light I will take. The rest, now that she has the skeptical spark, is up to her.

 Posted by at 10:16 pm
Sep 132013
 

….all the live long day.

So I am finally getting forced to make my IPad more useable as a work machine. My MacBook Pro is in the shop. The Dell laptop where we do bookkeeping and other Windows specific tasks is also in the shop (well actually, different shops), both with weird trackpad/bluetooth mouse issues. Coincidence? I think not! It must be a curse cast upon me. If my IPad goes south then I will be absolutely convinced.

In the meantime, I actually have discovered I can do most everything on the IPad, especially with the bluetooth keyboard attached. I may get used to it. It’s lighter, in some ways less distracting since there’s only one all on the screen at a time. When I’m working on my MacBook it’s usually attached to a second screen so I have multiple things going on at once.

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My normal work environment (plus cat)

 Posted by at 11:29 am
Jul 302013
 

The conference, which took place in Las Vegas in July, was fun, exciting and stimulating. Meeting James Randi and other skeptic heroes, attending a live recording of The Skeptics Guide to the Universe podcast and just talking to so many nice folks was a thrill.

I also came away inspired to become more active in the skeptical community and, more important, to engage the larger world with new found strength, knowledge and resources. I am not a scientist, physician, philosopher or magician. I am not formally trained in critical thinking. But I don’t think that will restrain me from finding ways to do my small part to help improve the quality of thinking about the world.

Among the many surprises at TAM was learning of an existing group of Humboldt Skeptics on Facebook. I was at TAM with the Eye’s Keven Hoover and we had been thinking of forming some kind of local skeptics group but thought we might have trouble finding more than a half-dozen compatriots. Turns out there’s a whole bunch of us! But connecting with them will certainly encourage us to create this organization on some level and start bringing evidence based thinking out into the world through meetings, presentations and networking.

skepticbloggers

Skeptic Bloggers

As a web developer and blogger, I also plan to become more active on the Internet (not just on the walled garden of Facebook) by writing more on skeptical topics, helping to create web spaces for regional skeptical activity and using some of the new tools that other skeptic activists have been creating.

Here are some of the more interesting resources for skeptical activity that I plan to take advantage of and potentially participate in.

SkepTools: A blog dedicated to sharing skeptical tools and resources for skeptical activism.

Rbutr: Prounced ‘rebutter’ this web app “..aims to facilitate inter-website debate, guide users to rebuttals of dubious information, and indirectly influence our users so that they approach all online information with an increased level of skepticism and critical appraisal.” Essentially it links websites/pages with other websites/pages that offer contrary evidenced. You can find and post websites and their rebuttals.

So, I am making a commitment to do what I can. “Small Tasks. Big Consequences.”

crowdsourcingskepticism

Crowdsourcing Skepticism
Small Tasks, Big Consequences

 

 

 

 

 

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Jul 262013
 

Last week I posted my initial impressions and an overall context for The Amazing Meeting that took place in July in Las Vegas.

It’s important for me to try and record some of the most important lessons from the 4 days of workshops, presentations and hallway conversation so that those ideas do not slip away completely. As a “First TAMer” (I have the button to prove it), I was a bit overwhelmed by the sheer volume of information, dazzled by seeing people whose words I’d  read and podcasts I’d listened to for so many years, and the simple pleasure of being enveloped in a “family” of over 1,000 like-minded individuals from around the world.

While all the speakers had unique perspectives on the concepts of skepticism and critical thinking, a few overriding themes seem to appear throughout the conference and I will start there:

Belief is Powerful

Most advocates of belief systems that have little or no objective evidence to support them are sincere. They are convinced the “woo works.” The self-deception of believers was demonstrated multiple times at TAM where people who professed to having some unique power failed a carefully crafted test of that power and yet, remained convinced they still had the power. They always came up with rationalizations as to why they failed this time, as if the test was an easily ignorable anomaly.

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The Sealed Room With 3 Objects
What Was Revealed?

We saw this demonstrated live on the last night of the conference during the “1 Million Dollar Challenge.” The James Randi Educational Foundation offers to pay anyone 1 million dollars if they can pass a mutually agreed upon test. Each year the Foundation goes through a rigorous screening process to find a worthy candidate and then work out with that candidate a test of his or her power. They make every effort to be sure the candidate understands the nature of the test, agrees to the criteria, and is convinced they can pass.

This year was unusual in that the candidate, who professed to have the power of remote vision (being able to see objects in another space at any distance) was in Algeria. The challenge was demonstrated live, over the phone, the candidate speaking through a chosen helper on stage, acting as his interpreter. He was supposed to be able to see which three objects out of 20 or so that everyone had agreed upon earlier, were placed in a room 3 days earlier and the room sealed. Needless to say, when the room was opened and the objects revealed  he had gotten zero correct. But when asked if he still believed he had the power of remote vision, he said yes. He had proven it many times to himself and to his friends, family and others in his community and that this one test was flawed, in spite of having many times agreed to everything and assuring everyone he would not fail.

Do Not Blame the Victim

Skeptics tend to judge, even sometimes laugh at people they see as being fooled by false or unproven ideas. However, everyone is susceptible to being fooled, especially people who think they are invulnerable (scientists, magicians, journalists, for example). The desire to believe is powerful and innate. Charismatic and forceful leaders are able to convince people to become adherents to their systems no matter how absurd those systems may seem to outsiders and critical thinkers. And self-deception can prove the most pernicious mind trick. Just read the sad story of Linus Pauling and the vitamin phenomenon, or Steve Jobs delaying medical treatment for pancreatic cancer in favor of CAM.

So to the fakers, those who consciously and cynically try to defraud people, show no mercy in exposing and ridiculing their practices. But tread more lightly on the true believers as they are us.

There is Plenty of Harm

Skeptics of skepticism may feel that things like Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), religious beliefs, and other areas of thought are harmless, sometimes helpful and people should be left alone to believe what they want. That’s fine until belief in concepts start inflicting harm, even death on the believers and others. Examples of the cost in both dollars and human suffering may be found atsWhat’s the Harm. Or listen to this bit of commentary from On the Media about Jenny McCarthy’s new gig on The View.

Pain in the neck

“Holy Man” blessing a child
in a village in India.
An investigation and intervention
by skeptic Sanal Edamaruku.

The harm to humanity in lost billions and lost or damaged lives means that learning to help fight against dubious claims and fraud is a worthwhile pursuit. Of the many things I learned at TAM, resources and tactics I was unaware of should prove valuable as I try to become more active in the skeptical community.

Stay tuned for Part 3.

 

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